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Backing Into a Neurotype

This topic contains 14 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  aramolson 5 days, 5 hours ago.

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  • #65304

    Michael
    Participant

    I haven’t taken the neurotype test but based on the description of the ideal workouts for the neurotypes, my favorite way to train is Type 1B.  I don’t necessarily share all of the personality traits of a 1B and I share some traits with a Type 3.  Like a 3, I need to have consistency in my compound lifts (snatch, C&J, squat, both front and back, and overhead press), and I don’t like programs that change these main lifts or include some odd variation of these lifts.  But when it comes to assistance work it’s anything goes.  I’m all about variety in the assistance work and many times I’ll just pick an exercise on the spot – I don’t plan my assistance exercises at all. I like lifting explosively and taking advantage of the stretch reflex. Forcing me to count tempo is torture. I don’t care for pump work.  I’ll do bodybuilding work if it’s part of a circuit, and even bodybuilding exercises I like doing explosively with heavy weight for low reps. I don’t really like following programs, and I prefer to ramp up to a heavy single.

    Some of my Type 3 traits: I’m a technique nerd, especially when it comes to the Olympic lifts, but I kind of need to be if I want to improve in these lifts. Also, I was never much of an athlete so I really need to work hard on the Olympic lifts to master good technique. I tend to do lots of practice sets on the Olympic lifts and lots of sets overall. I usually work up to a heavy single and then do back off sets. Although I don’t like rigid programs (like a 1B), this is due to “fear” that I won’t be able to complete it. For instance, if I had a long, hard day, and the program calls for a heavy training session, I “fear” that I either won’t make all the reps or worse, get injured trying to do so.  

    Since I know how I like to train, is that a valid way to “back into” a neurotype? Would it be accurate to say that I am a Type 1B, with a few Type 3 tendencies?

    #65315

    aramolson
    Participant

    It very much is a valid way. CT made a video about the mice studies, where a fiber type was unplugged from its enervating motor unit (neuron), and switched with a high/low fiber + neuron. It’s somewhere on this site, but all it basically shows is that fiber dominance can tell you a lot about what kind of lifting a person is biologically programmed to do. 

     

    I myself am the same as you. Love Olympic lifts, explosive personality but calm 99.99% of the time. My fiber dominance is very fast twitch and I learn motor patterns almost immediately. Coaching me just annoys me and I’d rather someone just “get out of my way” during a training session. 

     

    That being said, I tested 200+ combined 1A/1B points in the test, 4 points for 2A/2B, and 103 points for type 3. My introverted tendencies (type 3 score) developed from my childhood, but it’s obvious my neurotype is 1A volume tolerance with 1B skill/stretch reflex usage. 

    #65371

    aramolson
    Participant

    I’d likely say you are a type 3, since that fear can stop you from attacking the weights sometimes. 

     

    I am type-1 dominant and when I’ve had a long, rough day, nothing “resets” my frustration like maxing out on back Squat, cleans, snatch grip high pull, etc. 

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by  aramolson.
    #65373

    bdc5551
    Participant

    I think the neurotype stuff can point you into some good directions, but I wouldn’t take it as gospel, especially if you already know what type of training you respond to.  My highest score was a Type 3 (which I think is correct, especially personality-wise) but I am fairly gifted for muscle and strength.  I’m definitely not the endurance athlete type.  I also strongly prefer lower carb diets and I am a bit of a novelty seeker.  Most of the lifting strategies for a Type 3 are my preferred way to train, but I occasionally like to incorporate high intensity methods that are supposed to be “wrong” for a Type 3.  Nothing pumps me up more for a workout than something new. 

    So I’d look at the some of the suggestions for your neurotype and try them out if you haven’t, but don’t think you must train that way.    

    #65374

    aramolson
    Participant

    <hr /><br />
    I like this ^ 

    I believe the problem with the Type 3 scoring system of the Neurotyping Test is that it focuses on whether you socialize or not, and whether you like to be organized or not  

     

    a high drive to “win/be the best” (like type 1’s) can lead to making someone develop an efficient system for the daily aspects of their life. Especially given that 1B types do not like to waste time  

     

    in addition, type 2’s can be organized because it makes them feel “accomplished,” or simply because they are making their household better for the people they live with / work with  

    All of these aspects would lead to someone scoring high on the type 3 scale. 

    #65501

    bdc5551
    Participant

    Inversely, I also think some of the negatives of the Type 3 need to be considered in the proper context.  I definitely engage in harm avoidance behaviors and I hate change.  However, when it comes to training and other things I like, I do not engage in harm avoidance, because I enjoy those activities.  At my job I do get upset when things change suddenly, but I don’t mind on the fly changes when I workout.  As a matter of fact I often like change and novelty.  

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 10 hours ago by  bdc5551.
    #65503

    aramolson
    Participant

    Sounds like the neurotyping system needs an overhaul ….  😉 

    #65518

    Michael
    Participant

    Inversely, I also think some of the negatives of the Type 3 need to be considered in the proper context. I definitely engage in harm avoidance behaviors and I hate change. However, when it comes to training and other things I like, I do not engage in harm avoidance, because I enjoy those activities. At my job I do get upset when things change suddenly, but I don’t mind on the fly changes when I workout. As a matter of fact I often like change and novelty.

    This has been a good discussion. I just saw CT’s Youtube video on the Type 3 personality and can say that I am not nearly that much of a control freak nor do I have that high a level of anxiety. I also think that any rational person who is over 20 years old will have gain some Type 3 traits through experience.  Change at work is a good example.  I know from experience that whenever something changes at work it takes a few days for everyone to adjust.  During that time productivity goes down and it may be difficult to focus.  It’s not so much the change I don’t like but the disruption that comes with it. If every change went smoothly I wouldn’t mind so much, but when has that ever happened in the real world?

    With training it’s different.  If someone just wants to “get in shape,” constant variety can actually be a good thing. But if someone is training for a goal, some consistency is needed.  In my case, I plan on continuing to compete as a masters Olympic weightlifter.  As much fun as it would be to have a different workout each day, I know from experience that I must practice the lifts regularly or I will lose the skill.  That’s fine because I enjoy performing the lifts. I also know, again from experience, that bringing up my squat improves my weightlifting, so I know I need to squat regularly.  But other than the lifts themselves and squats, my other assistance exercises are based on variety. 

    #65520

    aramolson
    Participant

    <hr />

    That is a very good point about anyone over 20. 

     

    I was confrontational, impulsive, and defiant to a fault in my 16-26 year old phase. Being 31 years old, I avoid many behaviors which I used to embrace with zealotry. In civilized society, the smallest disagreement can result in metaphorical “shackles” being place on someone. 

    Stand up to a guy who wants to fight you: go to prison for the night 

    Drive faster than everyone: lost money / license 

    Never turn down a challenge?: get burned out 

    etc….

     

    nothing would be worse than society getting to control me, so I have to engage in harm avoiding behavior to avoid being “told what to do” by the government  

     

    #65521

    aramolson
    Participant

    Michael,

     

    i also agree with your analysis of “change” at work. When systems become routine/organized, they become FAST. When people want to slow down and change up an efficient system, it always gives me anxiety because I realize: my time is about to be wasted. 

    #65522

    bdc5551
    Participant

    Michael, i also agree with your analysis of “change” at work. When systems become routine/organized, they become FAST. When people want to slow down and change up an efficient system, it always gives me anxiety because I realize: my time is about to be wasted.

    That probably describes why I hate changes more accurately.  It’s not the change per se, but just the fact that I learned from experience that when things change it means my time is going to be wasted.  

    #65524

    aramolson
    Participant

    <hr />

    Many layers; very complex. 

    #65566

    Michael
    Participant

    Both of you got my point exactly.  To make things even more complicated, because we have learned that we need to be more structured in our work and personal lives, we are probably more daring when we train.  One of the reasons why I train, and I’m sure you both will agree, is to relieve stress and have some fun.

    I don’t think this requires a complete overhaul of the neurotype system, maybe just some tweaks.  

    #65645

    aramolson
    Participant

    I totally agree — nothing makes me feel more “centered” and balanced than after a heavy training session. Before my workout, I am a lot more prone to explode on people… lol

    #65646

    aramolson
    Participant

    To be fair to the neurotype test, focusing on “behaviors” as a way of determining neurotype is the only ethical way to test.  Until human experimentation becomes legal, we cannot truly know if a person’s behaviors are an exact indicator of their neurotype. 

     

    Hyperbole, obviously, but it makes my point. 

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